Alert Tracking Table

The following table provides a summary of the alerts issued to date and describes the status of each. Alerts may be withdrawn from circulation as circumstance demands.

Species Status Issued Version Last update
Asian Clam 4 known populations in Ireland. These are the River Nore, River Barrow, and the River Shannon at Carrick-on-Shannon and Lough Derg. Alert is active.

New population discovered in Foyle Backwater, March 2016 – INVAS survey carried out

April 2010

 

 

May 2016

V1.1 Febuary 2011

 

 

August 2016

Carpet sea squirt The carpet sea squirt alert was the first invasive species alert issued by Invasive Species Ireland. Since the time of issuing the alert, the species has been recorded 5 times. The species appears to have died out at Malahide marina and also Carlingford marina. Alert is active. March 2008 Awaiting update to new format December 2008
Harlequin Ladybird Two breeding populations have been reported from Cork City (2010 and 2011) and in Co. Carlow (2011). Alert is active in order to track the spread of the species and better inform any future response.
At least 3 breeding populations have been found in Belfast park locations.
November 2010

 

September 2016

V1.2

V 1.3

 

V1.4

December 2010

 

 

September 2016

Killer Shrimp Species is not recorded in Ireland or Northern Ireland. Alert issued to raise awareness and ensure rapid reporting of suspected sightings. Alert maintained by IFI. 2008 V1 n/a
Muntjac deer Confirmed sightings from Northern Ireland and Ireland. Insufficent information to determine abundance and if a breeding population is in the wild at present. Alert is active.

Extensive survey work and eradication carried out in Mount Stewart Estate – Muntjac Control Group formed.

March 2009

 

 

 

2014 to 2016

V1.1

V 1.2

August 2011

 

 

 

Conference in QUB October 2016

Raccoon One verified record from County Cork. A number of unverified records submitted from counties Kilkenny, Antrim, and Wexford. Alert is active. May 2011 V1 n/a
Siberian chipmunk After the initial alert, a further 10 records were submitted. There are now a total of 8 verified records for the island of Ireland. These are of individual animals. However, at one site there are records of at least two animals in the wild with one sighting of a dead animal on the roadside. Alert is active. September 2010 V1.1 November 2011
Slider Alert Alert issued for Yellow-bellied slider and red eared slider. Species are not believed to be successfully breeding in Ireland although eggs have been reported. Alert currently active in order to gather information on the distribution of animals and also aid promotion of responsible pet ownership. July 2009 V1.2 May 2011
Squirrel pox virus Alert issued following the confirmation of squirrel pox virus from five sites across the island of Ireland. Alert is active. January 2012 V1 n/a
Water Primrose Species not recorded in the wild in Ireland or Northern Ireland. Alert issued to raise awareness and ensure rapid reporting of suspected sightings. Alert maintained by IFI. 2008 V1 n/a
Wild boar and hybrids Alert originally issued in 2009. Since that time there have been a number of verified and unverified records reported. ISAP and Policy Position Statement published November 2012. Alert is active. 2009 Alert poster in development Alert poster in development
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What do the version numbers mean?

We use what is commonly known as ‘Version Control” in order to track changes we make to the alerts we issue. Some people may refer to version control as “Revision Control”.

The version control we use has three basic levels:

Level 1: VX

The first level of our version control is denoted by the letter ‘V’ followed by a number.

For example, ‘V1’ represents the fist version of the alert while ‘V2’ would represent the second version, and so on.

We will only go from one version to the next after:

  • Substantial changes in the Alert changing the content and key messages;
  • Substantial changes in the distribution of the species in questions; or
  • Cumulation of changes made to the document at other version levels warrants a new Level 1 version number.

Level 2: VX.x

The second level of our version control is denoted again by the letter ‘V’, followed by a number, then a decimal point, and then a another number.

For example, ‘V1.1’ would represent that some changes have been made to the alert following its initial release.

We will use the 2nd level version control when there is a need to make minor changes to the Alert. The following are a selection of the circumstances when we will use the 2nd level version control:

  • Updating the map with additions of new records; or
  • Minor changes to the text which do not substantially change the key message we are trying to convey.

Generally speaking, the old document would be withdrawn from public circulation but may be requested directly from the project team.

Level 3: VX.x.x

The third and final level to the version control is denoted again by the letter ‘V’, followed by a number, a decimal point, another number, another decimal point and then a final number.

For example, ‘V1.0.1’ would represent that some minor changes have been made to the alert following its initial release.

We will use the 3rd level version control when:

  • There is a need to correct typing errors; or
  • Modification of layout or images used on the alert poster.

Generally speaking, the old document would be withdrawn from public circulation and the project team would not keep a record of the old versions.