Curly waterweed

Lagarosiphon major

Overview

  • Photo credit: Rose Muir NIEA
 

  • Common Names: Curly waterweed, African elodea, Lagarosiphon, oxygen weed, South African oxygen weed, submerged onocotyledon

  • Habitat: Lakes and slow flowing aquatic systems such as canals, low energy rivers and streams. The plant can grow in water up to 6m deep. In addition to occupying the full water column, plant stands produce dense vegetation on the water surface.

  • Description: This species acts as an aggressive, invasive, alien plant species in Ireland but it is also regarded as a nuisance weed in its home territory. The leaves, 5-20mm long, are strongly recurved and are borne in whorls of 3 or in a spiral arrangement.  The long stem is brittle and easily broken (aiding dispersal). Only female plants are present and all reproduction is by fragmentation or vegetative reproduction. Due to its rampant growth, it develops rapidly into a tangled mass that blocks out the light and alters the entire ecosystem beneath. As a result, native aquatic plants and invertebrates are unable to survive. The plant also causes significant economic damage by choking up water channels and hydroelectric plants and by impairing boating and other water-based recreational activities. As the species is difficult to eradicate, it is important to prevent it from spreading into other EU countries. EU level action includes a ban on sales and any planting or keeping, including in isolated ponds. Furthermore, a rapid eradication of any new populations is required, to avoid the excessively high costs associated with its management later on. Where the species has become widely spread, appropriate management measures have to be taken.

  • Origin and Distribution: Originating from southern Africa but the species is now present in Europe and Britain.  

  • Impacts: The plant forms very dense infestations in suitable habitats and is capable of occupying the full water column in waters up to 6m deep leading to significant changes to the ecology for native plants, insects and fish. The species is a serious threat for tourism, angling, boating and other recreational pursuits as well as conservation goals. Due to its rampant growth, it develops rapidly into a tangled mass that blocks out the light and alters the entire ecosystem beneath. As a result, native aquatic plants and invertebrates are unable to survive. The plant also causes significant economic damage by choking up water channels and hydroelectric plants.

  • How did it get here? Native to South Africa, the species was introduced into Europe as an oxygenating plant for the aquarium trade. It has since established itself in slow-flowing water bodies, lakes and ponds across 11 Member States (Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, the Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, and the United Kingdom).

  • Where is it found in Ireland? Present at a number of sites throughout the island of Ireland.
 See the National Invasive Species Database for more information on the distribution of this species in Ireland.

 
  • Prevent Spread
BE PLANT WISE!!

  • Current Legislative Position (Listed on 03 August 2016)
    This species must not intentionally be brought into the Union; kept; bred; transported to, from or within the United Kingdom, unless for the transportation to facilities in the context of eradication; placed on the market; used or exchanged; permitted to reproduce, grown or cultivated; or released into the environment.
    For further queries, you can contact the Non Native Invasive Species Team in the Northern Ireland Environment Agency on 028 9056 9558.
Invasive Species Ireland

Invasive Species Ireland